martinsandiego
documentary & editorial photographer

Isham Dianalan in his looted home in Marawi, April 2018: "Ang hinihingi namin sa gobyerno, kahit wala kaming makuhang rehabilitation mula sa gobyerno, ang importante makabalik kami sa tinitirahan namin dito sa disumangcop." #marawi #everydayphilippines – Spherical Image – RICOH THETA

IN 360: Inside Marawi homes

All photos by Martin San Diego

Residents of Brgy. Daguguban and Brgy. Tulali come home to almost nothing five months after Marawi City’s liberation last April. Evacuees from the city are given a schedule of 3 days to retrieve whatever they can from their homes. Their homecoming were far from joyous as they found their life’s work either destroyed, burnt, or looted.

One year ago, ISIS-inspired Maute group attacked and occupied a large part of Marawi City, in the southern part of the Philippines. More than 250,000 residents were displaced. The battle for the city’s liberation ended after 5 months.

But for many of those who call Marawi home, the pains are still far from over as plans for them and the city’s rebuilding are still uncertain. They’d have to live in temporary shelters and relatives a bit longer, not knowing when they can return.

Here are some of them with what’s left:

Isham Dianalan, who works in a local school, looks at his looted home in Brgy.Tulali in Marawi City, Saturday, April 7. “Ang hinihingi namin sa gobyerno, kahit wala kaming makuhang rehabilitation mula sa gobyerno, ang importante makabalik kami sa tinitirahan namin dito sa disumangcop,” he said. (What we’re asking from the government, even if we don’t get any help from the, what’s important for us is that we can return to our homes here in disumangcop.)

Naima Abdurahman Palawan in his looted tailoring shop in Marawi, April 2018: "Tingnan mo yung mga motor, pinag hiwa-hiwa yung mga makina (ko pantahi). Anim na makina ito." – Spherical Image – RICOH THETA

Naima Abdurahman Palawan, 63, stands with what remain of her tailoring shop, April 7, in Marawi City. Naima came back to Marawi from Saudi in 2017 to open a tailoring shop using her savings. Everything got destroyed and stolen during the Siege that lasted several months.

Alihamdi Madzaman in his home in Marawi, April 2018: "Wala. Yung ano lang, mga sofa, sala set, yun lang. Kumbaga sa 100%, wala pang 5% yata (ang natira). Onti lang. Nasunog talaga." #marawi #everydayphilippines – Spherical Image – RICOH THETA

Abdul Asis Pundogar, 33, in his house in Brgy Tulali. His car behind him had its entire engine stolen.

Alihamdi Madzaman in his looted and burnt home in Marawi, April 2018: "Wala. Yung ano lang, mga sofa, sala set, yun lang. Kumbaga sa 100%, wala pang 5% yata (ang natira). Onti lang. Nasunog talaga." #marawi #everydayphilipines – Spherical Image – RICOH THETA

Alihamdi Madzaman: “Wala. Yung ano lang, mga sofa, sala set, yun lang. Kumbaga sa 100%, wala pang 5% yata (ang natira). Onti lang. Nasunog talaga.” (Nothing. Just the sofas, sal aset, only those are left. Let’s say out of 100, only 5% is left. Very few. All got burnt).

Lisa and Esa Ibrahim in what remained of their computer shop in Brgy Tulali, Marawi City, April 2018. #marawi #everydayphilippines – Spherical Image – RICOH THETA

Lisa and Esa Ibrahim rummages through the remains of their computer shop in Marawi City, Saturday, April 7.

Jalil Mamailaw in his burnt home in Marawi, April 2018: "Wala nang natira, wala na" – Spherical Image – RICOH THETA

Municipal councilor Jalil Mamailaw came home to a burnt house, Saturday, April 7, in Marawi City.
“Wala nang natira, wala na,” he said. (Nothing’s left. Nothing.)